Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst ... 234
Results 31 to 34 of 34

Thread: Croc's

  1. #31
    Lifetime Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Posts
    88
    I am back in the States and wanted to digest my second (two day stay) at Crocs after a whirlwind volcano tour which commenced after my initial 3 day stay at Crocs that I mentioned earlier. Ended up getting the room next door to my previous stay and it was smaller and had a definite stench of bleach over mold when I first opened the door. Once again service was superb and I wore the valet out with my rental because I was constantly running into town but I always bring a stack of two dollar bills with me and the ticos seem to like them over a rojo. I really appreciated the pool, barely looked at the casino and the beach on the north end just doesn't have the cachet that it does on the south end so I barely left the pool area. Good news was that the shower in this room had excellent hot water (it seemed that some of the handles are set so they cannot turn far enough to get the water much past warm. I noticed a definite difference in that the previous room handle wouldn't turn past six oclock but this one went to about 530 and that made all the difference. I don't know if I will come back to Crocs, its a nice resort but the price to value just doesn't seem to be there.

  2. #32
    Moderator Speedy1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    San Sebastián, San José, Costa Rica
    Posts
    2,876
    Good point on the $2 Bills. More money stuff...


    The 2-Dollar Bills are definitely a great idea Not only are they worth a touch more than a Rojo, they are also widely prized by Ticos, and especially Ticas and children. They are considered to be something like a "good luck charm", or at least a rare prize, here in Costa Rica. I always recommend bringing a small supply of them with you to Costa Rica. After the cash exchange, there's practically no difference in tipping a a $2 Bill vs. tipping a Rojo. They make an extra-special prize if you get fresh, new bills from your bank in the USA. I used to order them about 2 weeks before a trip from my local Bank of America, and never had a problem.

    It's really a good idea to order fresh $20 Bills as well, to avoid any exchange or acceptance issues. Actually, most ATM's that I have used in the USA dispense only fresh, new $20 Bills. I suppose that the banks do that on purpose, to keep the ATM from jamming on a worn, crinkled, or torn bill. $100 Bills should definitely be in immaculate condition, if you decide to bring any. I never travel with $100 Bills, as some kind of "problem" always seems to pop up at exactly the wrong moment. $500 is plenty of cash to get you started anywhere, until you need to hit the ATM. I rarely keep more than $500 in cash, when traveling. Remember... stolen or lost cash Cannot be replaced. $500 in new $20 Bills is about 3 millimeters thick and weighs less than an empty wallet.

    Avoid $50 Bills. Some Ticos don't even believe that there really is a $50 Bill, and that if they see one, then it must be fake money or some kind of a Joke.

    A few $5 and $1 Bills are good for tips, but you should be converting to Rojos and coins for tips as soon as possible... or using those $2 Bills. I've known guys here who have gotten a "quickie" for a $2 Bill. Now That is a Cheap Date!


    After your first trip, it's also a good idea to keep your leftover Colones, rather than exchanging them back to dollars, if you plan to return at all. When you return to Costa Rica, you have saved yourself Two exchanges. Plus, when you land after 10 p.m. and already have ₡100.000 Colones in your pocket, that's one less worry. Try to keep a good stash of smaller bills. Costa Rica is a "small money" economy. Most Ticos don't walk around with five or six ₡10.000 Bills in their pockets. Use your ₡10.000 Bills and get change whenever you can. Save those small bills and a few coins for tips and for whenever a small store or vendor gets irritated when you don't have exact change. Get your ₡10.000 Bills only from Banks or ATMs, as they are widely counterfeited, and some of the fakes are actually pretty good. Some ATMs will dispense ₡20.000 Bills. Try to avoid those ATMs, as nobody wants ₡20.000 Bills. If you do end up with ₡20.000 bills, use them only for purchases over ₡10.000, or you'll probably get stuck with a counterfeit ₡10.000 Bill as change. When a store or vendor does find a counterfeit ₡10.000 bill in its cash, it will usually try to pass it off to a customer as soon as possible. If a bank tries to give you ₡50.000 Bills, the best thing to say is, "I only want ₡10.000 or smaller Bills. ₡50.000 Bills are practically un-spendable, unless you are at a major store or hotel and are spending at least ₡30.000 or ₡40.000.

    One other thing that works well as a "Novelty" tip are the $1 Presidential Coins, especially if they are in like-new condition. Unfortunately, they also weigh a lot more than paper money and take up space. I used to occasionally bring a few with me, just for "special" occasions. They work great if a girl mentions that she has a kid. It's a lot harder for a child to destroy a coin than to mess up a brand-new $2 Bill.
    Last edited by Speedy1; 01-19-2016 at 11:42 PM.

  3. #33
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    16
    Quick question on Croc's for those who have stayed there: do the rooms have decent internet? I need to be connected to work from time to time and internet speed is important to me. I stayed at Cocal last year and while Internet was available, it was spotty at best and made the few things I had to do while there a bit difficult. Sorry for the mundane inquiry . . .

  4. #34
    Moderator Speedy1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    San Sebastián, San José, Costa Rica
    Posts
    2,876
    Quote Originally Posted by Crumpets99 View Post
    Quick question on Croc's for those who have stayed there: do the rooms have decent internet? I need to be connected to work from time to time and internet speed is important to me.
    Croc's is technology-friendly. The hotel even has its own app (actually a service of the hotel's technology contractor in the USA). I have stayed at Croc's five times, and the wifi in the hotel rooms and common areas was decent every time -- usually between 3 and 5 mbps. It can get a little slow at times, especially in the common areas when they are crowded (too many people using the same router or access point). There is also wired access (Cat 5 or Cat 6 jack) in each room. Some of the rooms had a cable in the room, and some did not. You can probably get a cable from the front desk, but you should probably bring your own if you want to use a cable. Croc's has only been open for about one year, so everything is still relatively new.

    I don't think it's a mundane request at all. Good wifi is important to a lot of people. Free wifi is a big deal in Costa Rica, and most decent hotels, bars, and restaurants have free wifi. The bandwidth varies, based upon the location and how many people are using the access point, but 1-3 mbps is pretty typical. The last time I was at Hard Rock Café (Cariari), it was blazing fast for Costa Rica... about 30 mbps. That was about 6 months ago, so I don't know if they still have that kind of bandwidth. The 4G service is really good, in the areas where it is offered. Unfortunately, it's tough to get a 4G signal at Croc's. It's much better at the south end of Jacó. You can get 3G at Croc's, most of the time, but even that is often less than 1 mbps.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •